A Hint of Sarcasm, and -International Affairs

The Economist - Chrome Rules the Web
"EMPIRES rise and fall swiftly on the internet. Google’s Chrome browser, which celebrates its fifth birthday next month, has captured much of the territory of older browsers and is now responsible for about 43% of all the web traffic generated by the world’s desktop computers. When Chrome was launched the dominant browser was Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE), with a 68% share—it is now down to just 25%.
It is only 20 years since Mosaic, the first browser capable of combining words and images in a single page, was made available. Some of its developers went on to launch Netscape, an improved version, in 1994, just as the internet was taking off. But Netscape’s dominance quickly crumbled after Microsoft started bundling IE with its Windows operating system. IE and Microsoft’s other software became so prevalent that in 2000 an American court briefly contemplated breaking the company into two. 
By 2010, when the European Commission forced Microsoft to start offering Windows users a choice of browsers, many were switching anyway, especially to Mozilla’s Firefox. Now Chrome is increasingly pushing Firefox to the margins. Measuring browser use is difficult and subjective: one source shows that IE is still in front in terms of numbers of visitors to websites. But for e-commerce, share of traffic matters more. By this measure Chrome now dominates much of the planet. Like the boast made of the British empire in Queen Victoria’s time, the sun never sets on its dominions.”

The Economist - Chrome Rules the Web

"EMPIRES rise and fall swiftly on the internet. Google’s Chrome browser, which celebrates its fifth birthday next month, has captured much of the territory of older browsers and is now responsible for about 43% of all the web traffic generated by the world’s desktop computers. When Chrome was launched the dominant browser was Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE), with a 68% share—it is now down to just 25%.

It is only 20 years since Mosaic, the first browser capable of combining words and images in a single page, was made available. Some of its developers went on to launch Netscape, an improved version, in 1994, just as the internet was taking off. But Netscape’s dominance quickly crumbled after Microsoft started bundling IE with its Windows operating system. IE and Microsoft’s other software became so prevalent that in 2000 an American court briefly contemplated breaking the company into two. 

By 2010, when the European Commission forced Microsoft to start offering Windows users a choice of browsers, many were switching anyway, especially to Mozilla’s Firefox. Now Chrome is increasingly pushing Firefox to the margins. Measuring browser use is difficult and subjective: one source shows that IE is still in front in terms of numbers of visitors to websites. But for e-commerce, share of traffic matters more. By this measure Chrome now dominates much of the planet. Like the boast made of the British empire in Queen Victoria’s time, the sun never sets on its dominions.”

Kal’s Cartoon via The Economist

Kal’s Cartoon via The Economist

“Meanwhile, Egypt’s archaic bankruptcy laws impose a heavy penalty for business failure, effectively discouraging experimentation. Declaring bankruptcy can land a merchant in jail, barred from doing business in the future and still liable for the debt.”
Egypt’s Economy of Dependence
New York woman visited by police after researching pressure cookers online

soitgoats:

She attributed the raid largely to her hunt for a pressure cooker, an item used devastatingly by the two Tsarnaev brothers in Boston, but also used by millions across the country to prepare vegetables while retaining most of their nutrients.

"Do you own a pressure cooker? My husband said no, but we have a rice cooker. Can you make a bomb with that? My husband said no, my wife uses it to make quinoa. What the hell is quinoa, they asked."

(Source: onthemaps)

NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander told an assembly of computer hackers and other cyber security experts that the spying operations were working within the law, but that they could still be improved.

Alexander: The whole reason I came here was to ask you to help make it better. If you disagree with what we're doing, you should help make it better. [The NSA] stand[s] for freedom.

Heckler #1: Bullshit!

Heckler #2: Read the Constitution

Alexander: I have. You should too.

Cue applause.

“The revelations [confirming that Edward Snowden’s oft-refuted claim that low-level NSA employees could spy on virtually any American without authorization] suggest that “[m]aybe Edward Snowden wasn’t such a blowhard, after all.””
Shane Harris, Foreign Policy
reuters:

U.S. government plans to end military drone strikes in Pakistan: on Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met with Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari (seen above, with Kerry) and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to re-establish a “full partnership” hurt by U.S. drone strikes and a 2011 NATO air attack in which 24 Pakistani soldiers were killed. Photo: REUTERS/Jason Reed

reuters:

U.S. government plans to end military drone strikes in Pakistan: on Thursday, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry met with Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari (seen above, with Kerry) and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to re-establish a “full partnership” hurt by U.S. drone strikes and a 2011 NATO air attack in which 24 Pakistani soldiers were killed. 

Photo: REUTERS/Jason Reed

(via onthemaps)